Chuck Wilson: He definitely belonged amongst the stars

In the last few days we have found out that our dear friend and colleague Chuck Wilson has passed away. Chuck was an active member of the AAA Astrophotography group, saxophone player by profession and great lover of Indian food. Chuck signed up for the very first and subsequent night sky photography classes and often met up with our various photo expeditions in Central Park, Jenny Jump or North South Lake.

Chuck was always making us laugh, had plenty to say about his 69 years on the planet and shared his knowledge of the sky. He headed to Tennessee to be with musician friends and witness the 2017 total solar eclipse, which he excitedly described upon returning.

Gowri reminds me Chuck loved to photograph the North American Nebula in Cygnus (the Swan) and would give anyone a tour of the region.

Earlier this year Chuck was being treated for various medical problems but continued to come to our Astrophotography meet ups. My last contact with him was in late June. In an email he mentioned the various medical procedures and as usual his critique of the current presidential administration.

He ended with thoughts about the astro-group: “And no matter if I’m tired & my feet hurt, I did NOT call for this horrible endless clouded out weather so nobody else could get anything done. Somehow the group has overcome these obstacles to get beautiful images anyway, so I’m very proud of everyone.

I hope I’m back on the scene soon!”

Gowri was the first to tell us of this news, please check out his Instagram post, @astro.gordonfreeman  with his very moving tribute.

And Gowri’s words in a message summed up Chuck: “He definitely belonged amongst the stars.”

A memorial service with be held Dec. 12 from 5 pm to 9 pm @ Union Hall (W 48th St, New York).

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