Events on the Horizon – May 2021

If you see a “members only” event in the list below that you want to attend but can’t, become a member ASAP so you can take advantage of these useful opportunities to meet amazing people, gain new skills, and learn about the universe!

 

New Episode of AAASky

Sunday, May 9

Cost: FREE

Listen HERE (or on iTunes, Spotify, Google Play, or Stitcher)

AAASky is the Amateur Astronomers Association‘s podcast for astronomy fans in New York City and beyond. Join co-hosts Irene and Stanley as they interview club members, prominent scientists, and personalities on the New York astronomical scene. Topics range from current space missions, night sky observing, astrophotography, cosmological research—plus AAA news and messages, and of course, Irene’s celestial forecast. Join us every other week to find out what’s happening above, with AAASky.

 

 

Lecture: “Getting to Know the Neighbors: Discovering New Galaxies in the Nearby Universe”

Tuesday, May 11

7:00 – 8:30 p.m. EDT

Cost: FREE

Location: Zoom

Register HERE.

Over the past few decades, surveys have revealed the presence of dozens of low-mass “dwarf” galaxies in the neighborhood around our home galaxy, the Milky Way. In this talk, Dr. Rhode will explain how she and her colleagues are using data from the Arecibo radio observatory in Puerto Rico and the WIYN optical telescope in Arizona to search for new galaxies in our own galactic backyard.

About the speaker: Dr. Katherine Rhode is an Associate Professor in the Department of Astronomy at Indiana University-Bloomington. She has a BA in physics from Sonoma State University, an MA in astronomy from Wesleyan University, and a PhD in astronomy from Yale. She and her students study the origin and evolution of galaxies with space-based and ground-based telescopes.

 

Observing in Crown Heights

Friday, May 14

8:00 – 10:00 p.m. EDT

Cost: FREE

Location: Utica Ave & Eastern Parkway (map)

Join AAA Observers for some views of the Moon, stars and other sights in the spring sky. This event is free and you do not need tickets, but masks and sign-in are required on site.

 

 

Livestream: Moon-topia

Monday, May 17

7:30 – 8:00 p.m. EDT

Cost: FREE

Location: AAA Facebook Live

Moon-topia – a monthly look at a few of the amazing moons of our solar system.

 

 

AAA Annual Meeting

Wednesday, May 19

7:30 p.m. EDT

Cost: Free, AAA members only

Location: Zoom, register HERE.

 A great opportunity to meet your fellow members, including those who serve on the Board of Directors and Executive Committee.

In addition to important information about the Association and discussions about our different activities, there will also be wonderful presentations, trivia, and all members will receive an email at 8 p.m. with a link to cast their vote for Lorraine Limpahan, who is a candidate to serve on the Board of Directors.

 

 

Observing in Bushwick

Friday, May 21

8:00 – 10:00 p.m. EDT

Cost: FREE

Location: Bushwick Ave & DeKalb Ave, Brooklyn (map)

Join AAA Observers for some views of the Moon, stars and other sights in the spring sky. This event is free and you do not need tickets, but masks and sign-in are required on site.

 

 

Solar Observing at Pier I

Sunday, May 30

1:00 – 4:00 p.m. EDT

Cost: FREE

Location: Pier I, Riverside Park South, New York, NY 10069 (map)

Join AAA astronomers for Solar Sundays! *Safely* view the Sun through solar filtered telescopes and solar viewing glasses. Never look directly at the Sun without a proper filter. Event is free; masks and registration required on site.

 

 

AAA continues to follow official recommendations regarding COVID-19 and coordinates with any partner institutions regarding event cancellations.

For the status of any event, check the AAA Calendar or Upcoming Events on the AAA website home page.

You can subscribe to the AAA Google Calendar on this page by clicking the button in lower right corner of page.

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