AAA President Message – December 2019

Dear AAA Members,

With many of us renewing our memberships this month, I encourage you to reflect on what AAA Membership means for you, and consider making a donation with your renewal. Whether through giving of our time, our finances, or both, each of us can help support the AAA purpose of promoting the study of astronomy and emphasizing its cultural and inspirational value.

Many of you participated in the Veteran’s Day Transit of Mercury event – some were assisting, observing and imaging at our posted sites, and others brought a telescope to work and setting up on their lunch hour. Thanks to all who pitched in! I thoroughly enjoyed reading about your experiences, and seeing the images and videos that you shared in the google-groups, and in Eyepiece articles by Roman Barroso, Parker Bossier, Bart Fried, Faissal Halim, Stan Honda, and Bruce Kamiat.

Early risers might catch Manhattanhenge Sunrise on December 5, or January 9. If you see it, please share your pictures and stories with us, by sending them to editor@aaa.org. If you’re interested in more astrophotography in and around NYC, we have a class for you! Registration is now open for Urban Astrophotography, a new class taught by Mauri Rosenthal and Alfredo Viegas.

Please note that the December lecture will be on the 2nd Friday this month. On December 13, Alex Teachey of Columba University will present “Exomoons: Kepler’s Hidden Gems.”

Mark your calendars for our annual Member’s Holiday Party on January 9. Planning is underway for a location near Union Square. You’ll receive an email announcement with details closer to date.

I wish you all a joyous holiday season with friends and family, and hope to see many of you at an upcoming AAA event.

Clear Skies,
Irene Pease
AAA President

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