Photos Of The Month

In this new segment of Eyepiece, we want to showcase all of the talent from within AAA when it comes to astrophotography. Here are the chosen photos for the month of October.

The Crescent Nebula, Steven Bellavia

 

Your target:

The Crescent Nebula, NGC 6888, in the constellation Cygnus

Where this photo was taken:

Backyard, Mattituck, NY

Equipment used:

Telescope: William Optics FLT-91 f/5.9 Apo Triplet
Flattener: TS Optics 1.0X Apo Flattener
Camera: ZWO ASI 294MM Pro, cooled to -10C, Gain 121, Offset 10, using BIN 2 mode
Integration:  

   –  Astronomik 6nm Ha filter, 45 x 240 seconds, Gain 121, BIN2  September 07 (3 hours integration)

   –  Astronomik 6nm OIII filter, 45 x 240 seconds, Gain 121, BIN2  September 06 (3 hours integration)

   –  30  Dark Frames , 30 Flat frames and 30 Dark-Flat frames for each filter
Mount: Sky-Watcher EQ6-R Pro
Guide Scope: The Bellavia Basic 50mm, f/7.5 custom guidescope
Guide Camera: ZWO ASI 290MC

Dates of image capture:  September 06 and 07, from my home, Mattituck, NY, approximately 8 PM to 2 AM each night

What made you choose this object?

I choose objects based on several criteria.

    1. The season, that is, the object is transiting (crossing the meridian) around the middle of the night (or middle of the darkest portion of the night  if the moon becomes an issue)
    2. It has interesting features and /or colors
    3. It is challenging. I like pushing the limits of my equipment and myself.

      The crescent nebula met all the criteria, and I especially love the “blue gel” that seems to be oozing out, which is Oxygen -ich gas, glowing from the energy of Wolf-Rayet star WR 136 (HD 192163).

The Harvest Moon, George Preoteasa

Your target:

The Harvest Moon, September 20, 2021

Where this photo was taken:

Eagle Rock, NJ

Equipment used:

Sony full frame camera with a Sigma telephoto lens 150-600mm with a 1.4x extender. The effective focal length is ~600mm.

What made you choose this object?

The target, if not obvious, was the moon and I chose it because it was photogenic against the Midtown skyline.

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